TMG Increases Engagement for DBEs and SBEs at Airport Event

On July 30th, 2014, TMG Consulting organized the 9th Annual Business Opportunities Workshop for the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport. This year featured a small business trade show, where small and disadvantaged businesses, along with resources agencies, tabled to showcase their talents. Attendance at this event topped over 120 small and disadvantaged business, prime contractors, resource agencies, and airport staff! The purpose of the Business Opportunities Workshop is multi-faceted:

  • to educate firms about the Airport’s Disadvantaged Enterprise (DBE) program and Small Business Enterprise (SBE) program;
  • to inform attendees about upcoming work opportunities at the Airport;
  • to facilitate networking among prime and potential subcontractor firms in order to create connections now, learn what businesses have to offer and prepare a qualified team when the next Baton Rouge Airport bid is released.
  • and to provide resources to help small businesses grow.

Small businesses are an integral aspect of the Baton Rouge Airport’s long-term vision and the airport has a history of actively engaging the DBE and small business communities on Airport contracts. The Airport DBE Program is mandated by the federal government under FAA grant assurances and aims to ensure that government grant funds are distributed equitably.

TMG Consulting has assisted the Baton Rouge Airport to draft and administer both DBE and SBE programs and regularly sets DBE project goals, conducts compliance reviews of bid, and monitors ongoing DBE participation on projects. Events such as these are hosted to help communicate the wide range of opportunities at an Airport for businesses and to demystify the DBE program for all contractors.

 

Contributed by:

Bonnie Garrigan
Manager of Economic Analysis
bonniegarrigan@tmg-consulting.net or 504.569.9239 ext.29

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 Disclaimer
The views, interpretations, or strategies expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of TMG Consulting. This site is meant for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice. TMG Consulting makes no representation as to accuracy, completeness, or suitability of any information on this site and will not be liable for damages arising from its display or use.

 

 

Impact of Sequester: Economic Impact Estimates will Become Less Reliable and More Expensive to Produce

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is planning to make significant program cuts as a result of the Budget Control Act of 2011 and the Sequester of funding. One such program that is in danger of being cut is the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (referred to as RIMS II).

RIMS II has served as a critical tool used for economic analysis for decades. It is used to describe how changes in economic activity (spending) impact jobs, earnings and additional spending in a specific region. It is the basis for projecting changes in jobs, earnings, and tax revenues, resulting from projects such as major hotel and casino developments, airport construction efforts, chemical plants expansions, as well as the jobs and spending created by major events such as the Super Bowl or the Final Four NCAA National Basketball Championship.

Since the 1970s, BEA has collected and processed economic data in order to generate RIMS II and offer it to the public on a cost-recovery basis. RIMS II is a commonly used tool by universities, public agencies, and private business alike.

The BEA has announced that effective immediately, the RIMS product will no longer be updated. Furthermore, effective September 30, 2013, all current versions and historical RIMS products will no longer be available for purchase.

On June 19th, the BEA released the following statement about the production RIMS II:

“BEA will eliminate its RIMS II product, which currently generates products on demand as events warrant. The RIMS II program will continue to accept and process orders, which are fulfilled on a cost-recovery basis, through the end of the fiscal year. BEA will not build and develop the data needed to update the data set and fulfill orders in future years.”

The BEA intends to discontinue RIMS II by September 30 of this year and estimates that cutting the program will save $1.4 million. This represents only 0.00016% of the Department of Commerce’s total budget of $9 billion in FY13, yet it will gravely impact the ability of  public agencies and private businesses to demonstrate how projects and initiatives can benefit the general public.

RIMS as a Share of Commerce Department Budget

RIMS II will not be easily replaced by a private sector solution, since most of these alternatives have historically relied upon the BEA and RIMS II in their own development. Without the collection and reporting of the data from BEA, these private sector alternatives will no longer be based on the independent and verifiable information. These potential private sector alternatives are also substantially more expensive than RIMS II, which was produced on a cost-recovery basis by the federal government.

TMG Consulting has reached out to our federally elected leadership and have urged them to support any efforts that would allow the reinstatement of the RIMS II program within the BEA budget. TMG would also ask that any other parties that rely upon the RIMS II program do the same.

Contributed by: Eric Melancon & Bonnie Garrigan

Eric Melancon is an Associate for TMG Consulting who specializes in evaluating economic impacts of major developments and events. Bonnie Garrigan is the Manager of Economic Analysis for TMG Consulting. 

ericmelancon@tmg-consulting.net 

bonniegarrigan@tmg-consulting.net

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 Disclaimer
The views, interpretations, or strategies expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of TMG Consulting. This site is meant for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice. TMG Consulting makes no representation as to accuracy, completeness, or suitability of any information on this site and will not be liable for damages arising from its display or use.

TMG Hosts Career Day with Middle-School Scholars

TMG Consulting recently hosted a team of 8th-grade students from our Mid-City neighbor John Dibert Community School.  Like many of us at their age, the students did not have a clear idea of what they wanted to do when they grow up. Some expressed interest in becoming athletes, musicians, or theatrical performers, seemingly influenced by what they see in the media.

We spent the morning exploring how the fields of engineering and urban planning were woven into the fabric of their daily life activities – from electrical engineers designing cellular phone communication towers to urban planners creating new streetcar routes.

Students learning about the fields of engineering, urban planning, architecture and construction.

Students learning about the fields of engineering, urban planning, architecture and construction.

Students learning about the fields of engineering, urban planning, architecture and construction.

Students learning about the fields of engineering, urban planning, architecture and construction.

With basic tools like a map of New Orleans, colored pencils, and markers, the students programmed their own streetcar routes based on their own points of interests.

One student living on the West Bank proposed creating a streetcar route from his house to school in Mid-City.  The proposed concept required a new trans-Mississippi bridge and significant track infrastructure.  This allowed for a discussion of planning priorities and the challenge of deploying needed services when faced with limited resources, like funding. The team considered how this new route would significantly benefit the larger community.

The students then collectively created a streetcar route to service 30 miles – approximately $600 million of investment in the New Orleans built environment. This then pushed our young urban planners to leverage existing routes to make the most of their allocated miles. They presented their proposed routes to their “client,” our own Mr. Chapman, with flying colors!

The next generation of urban planners designs new streetcar routes.

The next generation of urban planners designs new streetcar routes.

The next generation of urban planners designs new streetcar routes.

The next generation of urban planners designs new streetcar routes.

TMG enjoyed sharing our passion for engineering and urban planning with these students to create a more vibrant city. We had great fun working with these young scholars and shaping the career aspirations of the next generation.

Contributed by:

Mimi Tsai

Feasibility Analyst

mimitsai@tmg-consulting.net  

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Disclaimer
The views, interpretations, or strategies expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the position of TMG Consulting. This site is meant for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice. TMG Consulting makes no representation as to accuracy, completeness, or suitability of any information on this site and will not be liable for damages arising from its display or use.

Economic Development: Invest in Transit

Source: www.ridemetro.org

Houston’s Light Rail, http://www.ridemetro.org

We at TMG have been working for months to statistically, economically or even anecdotally correlate good public transit to economic prosperity in a city.  Observationally, cities that support strong economies like New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, and Boston have a transit system with good coverage and high frequency.  It is unknown whether good transit attracts economic development, or if economic development demands good transit.  We are still working to develop a successful index to correlate these two factors. Here is what we do know: (more…)